Dad Ears

My son lays on the centre of the bed;

Obnoxiously repeating the few sounds he knows. No, he's not crying, he's blabbering on while eating his shirt and kicking his feet. He gets louder with every syllable. 

Dramatic? Definitely. Inherited from his mother? Probably.

Josh lays beside him. Just inches out of Luca's reach, and even as Luca gets louder, Josh remains unmoved. His eyes are closed, and although he told me he was "Just Resting" his eyes ten minutes ago, he's full blown snoring now.  

All the while Luca yammers on, blowing raspberries and eating his feet. 

Truth is, it isn't the first time and I know it won't be the last. 

 

 

 

Men come preset with the "Selective Hearing" function but once a baby comes along. BAM! Selective Hearing all the sudden becomes:

Dad Ears. 

BUT What does it mean?

In my house, it means Josh can lay 3 feet away from Luca and I can lay 4, maybe even 5, feet away, but when Luca wakes up screaming, Josh can still sleep like the dead. 

It means that I can be cooking in the kitchen and Luca can be sitting in front of Josh, and some how I can hear Luca fussing but Josh can't. 

 

It's selective hearing... only on steroids. 

 

However, Hawk Eyes and Cat-like Reflexes usually come paired with Dad Ears. 

Somehow, Josh can see Luca tipping over from 3 feet away and rush to catch his head millimetres from hitting the ground. Somehow, Josh can catch the cup from hitting the ground before I've even noticed he's thrown it. 

So while his dad ears can tune out the mindless chatter, and selective hearing may still enable him ignore you when you ask him to take the garbage out, I promise the newest functions on the  "Dad Model" make it worth it. 

 

 

 

Katt Ruzic

Calgary, AB, T3N0L1

Just your typical make-up obsessed, millennial Momma blogging about the trials and tributes of raising a little boy to be the perfect gentleman. Surviving single-parenthood with humour, copious amounts of coffee and knowing that when coffee doesn't cut it anymore, switching to wine doesn't make you a bad mom.